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We Defend Healthcare Providers Nationwide in Audits & Investigations

Part I: The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act: Provisions Relevant to Healthcare Providers

By Michael Cook, Jennifer Papapanagiotou & Andy Lynch –  Partners at Liles Parker, PLLC.

(March 31, 2020):  On March 27, 2020, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act[1] passed the House of Representatives by a voice vote. The President then signed the bill into law. The bill is the third round of federal government support in the wake of the coronavirus public health crisis and associated economic fallout, succeeding the $8.3 billion in public health support passed two weeks ago and the Families First Coronavirus Response Act.  Liles Parker has published a series of articles highlighting the waivers and other actions taken by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and other Federal and State agencies to ease the burden on healthcare providers during the COVID-19 public health emergency.[2]  This article is the first in a two-part series that will highlight some of the more significant provisions of the Cares Act.

I.   Support for Healthcare Providers

  • Section 3211, Supplemental Awards for Health Centers: The CARES Act provides for supplemental awards for FY 2020 for federally qualified health centers, including an additional $1,320,000,000 for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of COVID-19 or the detection of SARS-CoV-2.
  • Sections 3212 – 3213, Reauthorizations of HRSA Rural Development and Telehealth Network Grant Programs: The Act reauthorizes HRSA’s Rural Health Care Services Outreach, Rural Health Network Development and Small Health Care Provider Quality Improvement grant programs, as well as the Telehealth Network and Telehealth Resource Center grant programs.
  • Section 3214, Modernization of the Public Health Service: The legislation creates a Ready Reserve Corps to ensure that there are enough doctors and nurses ready to respond to public health emergencies like COVID-19.
  • Section 3215, Limitation of Liability for Volunteer Health Professionals During COVID-19 Emergency Response: This section holds harmless from liability under federal or state law, health care professionals who volunteer their service during the public health emergency for the COVID-19 pandemic declared by the Secretary of HHS.  There are a number of conditions that must be satisfied for this limitation of liability to be effective.

Among these, the limitation of liability covers only professionals who are truly volunteers and who do not receive compensation in the course of providing health care services in the diagnosis or treatment of COVID-19.  The professional must be acting within the scope of her/his license, registration, or certification under the State of licensure/certification, and may not exceed the scope of the license/certification of similar professionals in the State in which the action or omission occurs.  The limitation of liability does not cover willful or criminal misconduct, gross negligence and other similar types of flagrant misconduct.

The provision applies only to conduct that occurs on or after the date of enactment of the CARES Act and is only in effect during the period of the public health emergency declared by the Secretary during the pandemic.

  • Section 3216, Flexibility for Members of the National Health Service Corps During the Emergency Period: During the period of the emergency declaration, this provision allows the Secretary to temporarily re-assign members of the National Health Services Corps to provide service outside of the areas to which they have been assigned to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. The assignment would need the member’s voluntary agreement and would need to be “within a reasonable distance” of the original assignment, and the member would need to maintain the number of hours originally required of her/him.    

II.   Provisions Affecting Coverage and Payment Under the Medicare & Medicaid Programs

  • Section 3701, Health Savings Accounts for Telehealth Services: This section allows a high-deductible health plan (HDHP) with a health savings account (HSA) to cover telehealth services prior to a patient reaching the deductible, increasing access for patients who may have the COVID-19 virus and protecting other patients from potential exposure.
  • Section 3702, Over-the-Counter Medical Products without Prescription: This section allows patients to use funds in HSAs and Flexible Spending Accounts for the purchase of over-the-counter drugs and menstrual care products without a prescription from a physician. This section appears to reverse the ACA and makes permanent the over-the-counter drug changes during the 2020 plan year and after.
  • Section 3703, Expanding Medicare Telehealth Flexibilities: This section eliminates the requirement included in the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2020 (Public Law 116-123) that limits the Medicare telehealth expansion authority during the COVID-19 emergency period to situations where the physician or other professional has treated the patient in the past three years. This enables beneficiaries to access telehealth, including in their home, from a broader range of providers, reducing COVID-19 exposure for the duration of the public health emergency.
  • Section 3704, Allowing Federally Qualified Health Centers and Rural Health Clinics to Furnish Telehealth in Medicare: This section allows, during the COVID-19 emergency period, Federally Qualified Health Centers and Rural Health Clinics to serve as a distant site for telehealth consultations. A distant site is where the practitioner is located during the time of the telehealth service. This section will allow FQHCs and RHCs to furnish telehealth services to beneficiaries in their home. Medicare will reimburse for these telehealth services based on payment rates similar to the national average payment rates for comparable telehealth services under the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule. It will also exclude the costs associated with these services from both the FQHC prospective payment system and the RHC all-inclusive rate calculation.
  • Section 3705, Expanding Medicare Telehealth for Home Dialysis Patients: This section eliminates a requirement during the COVID-19 emergency period that a nephrologist conduct some of the required periodic evaluations of a patient on home dialysis face-to-face, allowing these vulnerable beneficiaries to get more care in the safety of their home.
  • Section 3706, Allowing for the Use of Telehealth during the Hospice Care Recertification Process in Medicare: Under current law, hospice physicians and nurse practitioners cannot conduct recertification encounters using telehealth. This section allows, during the COVID-19 emergency period, qualified providers to use telehealth technologies in order to fulfill the hospice face-to-face recertification requirement.
  • Section 3707, Encouraging the Use of Telecommunications Systems for Home Health Services in Medicare: This section requires the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to issue clarifying guidance encouraging the use of telecommunications systems, including remote patient monitoring, to furnish home health services consistent with the beneficiary care plan during the COVID-19 emergency period.
  • Section 3708, Improving Care Planning for Medicare Home Health Services: This provision enables nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants to order home health services, and certify and recertify patients for home health care. These changes also apply to Medicaid and become effective when HHS publishes implementing regulations, which must be within six months of the enactment of the CARES Act.  Unlike many of the provision of the Act, this provision is permanent and survives the end of the emergency.
  • Section 3709, Adjustment of Sequestration:  The CARES Act suspends the mandatory 2% global reductions under the sequestration order for the period May 1 through the remainder of calendar year 2020.
  • Section 3710, Medicare Hospital IPPS Add-On Payment for COVID-19 Patients During Emergency Period: The Act increases DRG weights by 20% for patients diagnosed with COVID-19 during the emergency period.
  • Section 3711, Increasing Access to Post-Acute Care During the Emergency Period: The Act waives certain requirements for inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs) and long-term acute care hospitals (LTCHs).  For IRFs, the provision waives the requirement that a patient receive at least 15 hours of therapy per week.  For LTCHs, the provision waives the requirement of a payment adjustment where an LTCH does not have a discharge percentage of 50% of patients who would meet the eligibility requirements during the emergency period.  The provision also waives the site-neutral payment rate for discharges occurring during the emergency period that are in response to the public health emergency.
  • Section 3712, Revising Payment Rates for DME Under Medicare During the Emergency Period: This Section prohibits scheduled payment reductions in Medicare DME during 2020 and the emergency period.
  • Section 3715, Providing Home and Community-Based Services in Acute Care Hospitals:  A number of waivers under sections 1915 and 1115 of the Social Security Act provide for home and community-based services for individuals who otherwise would require care in a hospital, nursing facility, or ICF/MR.  This provision allows states to cover these services to individuals under certain of these waivers while they are in an acute care hospital if they meet certain conditions, including that they are identified in the individual’s care plan, not provided through the hospital, not a substitute for services that the hospital is otherwise required to provide, and are designed to ensure a smooth transition to the community and preserve the individual’s functional abilities.
  • Section 3719, Expansion of Medicare Hospital Accelerated Payment Program During COVID-19 Public Health Emergency: During the period of the emergency, this provision expands the accelerated hospital payment program by allowing acute care hospitals, cancer hospitals, children’s hospitals, and critical access hospitals (CAHs) to apply for up to 6-months’ advance payment of up to 100%, and for CAH’s 125%, of anticipated payments.  The provision also provides for 120 days before claims are offset to recoup these payments and not less than 12 months after the date of the first accelerated payment before the outstanding balance must be paid in full.

Administrative Implementation to Encompass All Providers:  On March 28, 2020, CMS published a press release and a Fact Sheet that expanded the availability of the accelerated advance payment program to all Medicare participating health care providers and suppliers.  These advance payments will be based on historical payments.  The Press Release states that “… [t]he payments can be requested by hospitals, doctors, durable medical equipment suppliers and other Medicare Part A and Part B providers and suppliers.”  The applicants must: have billed Medicare for claims within 180 days of the request; not be in bankruptcy; not be under active medical review or program integrity investigations; and not have delinquent Medicare overpayments.  Applications are made to the MACs, and CMS anticipates that payments will be issued within seven days of a request.  Providers described in the legislation, above, can request payments for an amount for up to a six-month period, while other types of providers can request up to a three-month period.  The Fact Sheet provides further instructions on the process.[3]

  • Section 3720, Delaying Requirements for Enhanced FMAP to Enable State Legislation Necessary for Compliance: The The Families First Coronavirus Relief Act increases State Federal assistance matching percentages (FMAP) percentages by 6.2% during the calendar quarters that encompass the emergency period if the State meets certain conditions, one of which was that it did not increase premiums in excess of what they were on January 1, or impose new premiums, during this period.  This provision gives any state that has raised or imposed such premiums since January 1, a thirty-day delay in the enforcement of that requirement – presumably to provide the State an opportunity to come into compliance without losing the increased matching rate.

III.   Health and Human Services Extenders

  • Section 3811, Extension of Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration: The CARES Act extends and provides funds for the demonstration through November 30, 2020.
  • Section 3812, Extension of Spousal Impoverishment Protections: This section of the Act extends certain protections from spousal impoverishment through November 30, 2020 to help a spouse of an individual who qualifies for nursing home care to live at home in the community.
  • Section 3813, Delay of DSH Reductions: The CARES Act delays Medicaid DSH reductions that were to begin on May 23, 2020, to begin, instead, on December 1, 2010.

IV.   Economic Stabilization and Assistance to Severely Distressed Sectors of the United States Economy

Title IV of the Act provides $500 billion in funding for loans and financial assistance to mid-size and large businesses, states and municipalities and non-profits.  $46 billion of these funds are specially allocated to the airline industry and industries critical to national security.  Assistance to airlines and national security industries will be via direct U.S. Department of Treasury loans and investments.

The remaining $454 billion is available to assist other businesses, states and municipalities and non-profits. The financial assistance will be made available via a Federal Reserve Act Section 13(3) program to provide financing through banks and other lenders.  This assistance targets businesses employing between 500 and 10,000 employees.  The assistance is contemplated primarily as low interest loans (interest rate not exceeding 2% per annum) with payments of principal and interest deferred for the first six months or longer.

The Act provides conditions on eligibility and terms and conditions of loans, including:  (i) economic conditions make the loan necessary to support ongoing operations, (ii) funds will be utilized to retain or restore at least 90% of workforce, (iii) prohibitions on dividends and stock buybacks while the loan is outstanding, and (iv) restrictions on offshoring jobs and a requirement that a majority of employees are based in the U.S. Other requirements, terms and conditions for loans and assistance will be determined and set forth in the Department of Treasury and Federal Reserve guidelines.  Title IV assistance does not provide for future loan forgiveness.

Application procedures and guidelines for the Title IV program are to be published shortly by the Department of Treasury and the Federal Reserve.

V.   HHS – Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund

The CARES Act establishes a $100 billion “Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund” to reimburse eligible providers for health care related expenses or lost revenues that are attributable to the coronavirus.  The Act further defines eligible health care providers to be public entities, Medicare or Medicaid enrolled suppliers and providers, and other entities that the Secretary includes that provide diagnosis, testing, or care for individuals with possible or actual cases of COVID-19.  These funds are available for building or construction of temporary structures, leasing of properties, medical supplies and equipment including personal protective equipment and testing supplies, increased workforce and trainings, emergency operation centers, retrofitting facilities, and surge capacity.  To be eligible, providers are required to apply to HHS.

VI.   Conclusion:

Liles Parker attorneys and staff are closely monitoring HHS, CMS and CDC guidance and will update as new information becomes available. Please contact us with questions or for assistance with your response to this unprecedented National Emergency.

CARES ActCARES ActCARES Act

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Cook, Jennifer Papapanagiotou and Andy Lynch are Partners at Liles Parker, PLLC.  They each have decades of experience representing health care providers and suppliers and other businesses around the country in connection with a wide range of matters.  Questions regarding the impact of recent coronavirus guidance on your organization?  Call Liles Parker for a free consultation.  We can be reached at:  1 (800) 475-1906.

[1] See this link for a full copy of the CARES Act.

[2] For a collection of all articles written by Liles Parker attorneys related to the COVID-19 public health emergency, please visit our webpage at this link.

[3] The CMS Press Release on the Accelerated and Advanced Payment process can be accessed here and the Fact Sheet can be accessed here.

Operating a Medical Practice in Texas during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Texas SNF Providers are Under Audit(March 30, 2020): The COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented and has resulted in President Trump declaring a National Emergency[1] and Secretary Alex Azar, of the US Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) to declare a public health emergency[2] for the nation. The effects of this pandemic have been felt across the country, and understandably, numerous disruptions to clinic operations have occurred. These uncertainties have left providers questioning the types of procedures that can be completed during the pandemic.  This article examines COVID-19 related guidance from the Texas Governor’s Office, the Texas Medical Board (Board}, and the Texas Attorney General’s Office with respect to medical clinics in Texas. However, this review is not exhaustive. It should be kept in mind that due to the rapidly evolving nature of this public health emergency, that any guidance would need to be constantly updated. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that a practice consult with legal counsel to address any concerns specific to their practice.

I.    The Impact of COVID-19 on Telemedicine Laws in Texas:

When possible, it is highly advisable that practices conduct visits through telemedicine or postpone visits that are able to be completed at a later date. During the pandemic, some Medicare telemedicine laws have been relaxed to expand coverage.[3] In addition, some states have expanded access to telemedicine as well. Texas is one of the states that has expanded access to telemedicine services.

  • Expansion of Telemedicine.

On March 14, 2020, the Governor of the State of Texas, Greg Abbott, approved the Board’s request to temporarily suspend Texas Occupation Code 111.005 (a)-(b) and Title 22, Chapter 174.6 (a)(2)-(3) of the Texas Administrative Code. Pursuant to these suspensions, Texas has approved phone only consults as telemedicine. Specifically, the Board has advised: “Telemedicine, including the use of telephone only, may be used to establish a physician-patient relationship. This expanded use of telemedicine may be used for diagnosis, treatment, ordering of tests, and prescribing for all conditions. The standard of care must be met in all instances.” These suspensions are in effect until the March 13, 2020 disaster declaration is lifted or expires or they are terminated by the Office of the Governor.[4] It is important to note that only encounters that are initiated by a patient, or the patient’s proxy decision maker, are allowed to qualify as telemedicine under these rule changes.[5]

  • Telemedicine for Chronic Pain.

On March 19, 2020, Governor Abbott approved the Board’s request to temporarily suspend 22 TAC § 174.5(e)(2)(A). This law previously stated, “Treatment of chronic pain with schedule drugs through the use of telemedicine medical services is prohibited.”[6] According to the Board, this “waiver allows telephone refill(s) of a valid prescription for treatment of chronic pain by a physician with an established chronic pain patient. Due to the seriousness of the opioid crisis and the need to ensure there is proper oversight of chronic pain management, this suspension is only in effect until April 10, 2020.”[7] The Board also added however, that the physician “remains responsible for meeting the standard of care and all other laws and rules related to the practice of medicine. The standard of care must still be maintained related to the treatment of chronic pain patients.” This order opens up the possibility of continuing to treat some chronic pain patients via telemedicine which previously was not possible.

However, there are still many instances that telemedicine cannot adequately address the needs of a patient. Therefore, providers in Texas need to be aware of the new limitations placed on them when completing non-urgent elective procedures or surgeries.

II.   Executive Order GA-09:

On March 22, 2020, the Governor Abbott, issued Executive Order No. GA-09. Executive Order GA-09 ordered that:

[A]ll licensed health care professionals and all licensed health care facilities shall postpone all surgeries and procedures that are not immediately medically necessary to correct a serious medical condition of, or to preserve the life of, a patient who without immediate performance of the surgery or procedure would be at risk for serious adverse medical consequences or death, as determined by the patient’s physician;

PROVIDED, however, that this prohibition shall not apply to any procedure that, if performed in accordance with the commonly accepted standard of clinical practice, would not deplete the hospital capacity or the personal protective equipment needed to cope with the COVID-19 disaster.

GA-09 applies to the entire state of Texas and is currently in full force and effect until 11:59 p.m. on April 21, 2020 unless the order is modified, amended, rescinded, or suspended by the governor.[8]

  • Related Texas Attorney General Guidance.

On March 23, 2020, Texas Attorney General, Ken Paxton, warned all licensed health care professionals and all licensed health care facilities, including abortion providers, that they must postpone all surgeries and procedures that are not immediately medically necessary. It was clarified that this prohibition applies to all surgeries and procedures that are not immediately medically necessary, “including routine dermatological, ophthalmological, and dental procedures, as well as most scheduled healthcare procedures that are not immediately medically necessary such as orthopedic surgeries or any type of abortion that is not medically necessary to preserve the life or health of the mother.”[9] Attorney General Paxton noted that the failure to comply with the executive order can result in penalties of up to $1,000 or 180 days of jail time.[10]

  • Related CDC Guidance.

The CDC recommends that elective surgeries at inpatient facilities be rescheduled as necessary and recommends that urgent inpatient diagnostic and surgical procedures be moved to outpatient settings when feasible. In addition, any non-urgent outpatient visits should be rescheduled.[11]

  • Related CMS Guidance.

 CMS has issued guidelines regarding “Adult Elective Surgery and Procedure Recommendations: Limit all non-essential planned surgeries and procedures, including dental, until further notice.” CMS also included a tiered framework with guidance regarding the types of procedures that should be completed or postponed.[12]

  •  Texas Medical Board Emergency Rules and Guidance.

On March 24, 2020, the Texas Medical Board (Board) issued guidance stating that it will enforce Executive Order GA-09 and passed emergency Board rules to enforce the “Executive Order’s prohibition against performing surgeries or medical procedures that are not immediately medically necessary through April 21, 2020.”[13]

A.  Board Emergency Rules.

On March 23, 2020, the Board adopted emergency rules to enforce Executive Order GA-09. These rules allow the Board to quickly act if it is determined that a licensee is in violation of the Executive Order. The emergency rules have amended 22 TAC § 187.57(c) and 22 TAC § 178.4(d). The Board updated 22 TAC § 187.57(c) to amend the current definition of “Continuing Threat to the Public Welfare” to include the “performance of a non-urgent elective surgery or procedure.”[14] The Board also amended 22 TAC § 178.4(d) to require immediate reporting of “any physician scheduling to perform, preparing to perform, performing, or  who has performed a non-urgent elective surgery or procedure.”[15]

B.  Board Guidance and Answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs):

The Board has recognized that there are different levels of need for “elective” surgeries. These levels of need can be distinguished by terms such as “urgent,” “emergent,” “or acuity.” Despite the differences in terminology used, the Board has stated that the physician must determine “if these types of procedures are delayed or canceled, will a patient be at risk for serious adverse medical consequences or death.”[16]

Due to the changes in 22 TAC § 187.57(c), the Board defined procedures that are “urgent or elective urgent” as “a surgery or procedure is scheduled where there is a risk of patient deterioration of disease progression that is likely to occur if the procedure is not undertaken immediately and/or the surgery or procedure is significantly delayed. The resulting decline in the patient’s health could make them more vulnerable to COVID-19 and other issues.”[17]

As Executive Order GA 09 and 22 TAC § 187.57(c) provides that this prohibition does not apply to a procedure that, if performed in accordance with the commonly accepted standard of clinical practice, would not deplete the hospital capacity or the personal protective equipment (PPE) needed to cope with the COVID-19 disaster. What does this mean?  As the Board’s guidance reflects:

“Executive Order GA O9 stated that PPE and hospital capacity needed to fight COVID-19 should not be depleted. Because PPE and hospital capacity are a critical need, procedures under this section of Executive Order GA 09 and 22 TAC § 187.57(c) must still meet the criteria of being medically necessary to prevent ‘risk for serious adverse medical consequences or death, as determined by the patient’s physician,’ regardless of the office, facility, local, regional, or state availability of PPE and hospital capacity.[18]

In order to assist providers with determining whether a surgery or procedure can be performed, the Board has drafted a number of questions for the provider to consider:

Question #1: Does this prohibition apply to me or my practice location?

“The prohibition applies to ALL licensed healthcare providers and their delegates. It also applies to all licensed healthcare facilities. If you are a licensed healthcare professional or delegate, or performing the medical act in a licensed healthcare facility, proceed to #2.

Question #2:  Is the medical act a surgery or procedure?

  • Yes, proceed to #3.

  • No, I am performing other medical acts, such as a history, physical exam, non-invasive diagnostics, or ordering/performing lab tests. If your answer is no, you may proceed with the medical act.

Question #3:  If the medical act is a surgery or procedure, then you must ask the following questions:

  • Is this immediately medically necessary to correct a serious medical condition or to preserve the life of a patient?

  • Would this patient, without immediate performance of the surgery or procedure, be at risk for serious adverse medical consequences or death? If you answer yes to either of the above questions, you can proceed with the medical act. You should document the medical necessity and serious risk in the patient’s medical record. In determining how to answer the above questions, please review the above discussion of urgent vs. non-urgent and elective surgery or procedure.

Also note that performance of the following medical acts would generally not be considered immediately medically necessary/pose a serious risk:

Routine dermatological procedures;

  • Routine ophthalmological procedures;
  • Routine dental procedures;
  • Nonemergent orthopedic surgeries;
  • Cosmetic and plastic surgeries;
  • Nonsurgical cosmetic procedures; and
  • Abortion not medically necessary to preserve the life or health of the mother.

If a physician determines that an elective surgery is necessary and that the surgery would not violate Executive Order GA-09 or Board rules, the Board advised: “Documentation is key. It is very important that the medical record clearly reflects why the elective surgery or procedure was urgent and necessary to prevent serious adverse medical consequences or death. This documentation could include information on the patient’s medical history, prescriptions, lab results, imaging, or other relevant factors used to help make the determination of the urgent necessity of the elective surgery or procedure.” Therefore, if a surgery or procedure must be performed, it is very important that the physician clearly document why the procedure or surgery was necessary at this time.

The Board has also stated in its guidance that the performance of a non-urgent elective procedure may be determined by the Board to be a continuing threat to public welfare. If the Board received a complaint of this nature, it “may result in a temporary suspension or restriction hearing with or without notice depending on the circumstances. Any Board action to restrict or suspend a licensee’s license, even if temporary, will trigger a mandatory report to the National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB).”[19]

 III.  Conclusion:

If a surgery or procedure is elective and it is possible to postpone the procedure, the procedure should be postponed. However, where a patient who without immediate performance of the surgery or procedure would be at risk for serious adverse medical consequences or death, as determined by the patient’s physician, it may be performed. While the rules state that if the procedure were performed in accordance with the commonly accepted standard of clinical practice, the [non-urgent elective surgery or procedure] would not deplete the hospital capacity or the personal protective equipment needed to cope with the COVID-19 disaster, then the physician may perform the procedure. However, the Board has clearly stated that due to the pandemic, all surgeries must meet the criteria of being medically necessary to prevent “risk for serious adverse medical consequences or death, as determined by the patient’s physician.”

If a practice in Texas is going to perform any surgeries or procedures while these rules are in effect, the decision to perform the surgery or procedure must be made on a case by case basis. The physician will need to make a determination that the specific patient would be at risk for a serious adverse medical consequences or death without performance of the procedure. These findings would need to be clearly documented in the patient’s record along with any support for the findings. A Texas physician who performs any procedure during this disaster should be prepared to defend the procedure in front of the Board if necessary.

Physicians should be aware though that the Board has significant authority to enforce the recently passed emergency legislation. Physicians are required under the newly enacted laws to immediately report “any physician scheduling to perform, preparing to perform, performing, or who has performed a non-urgent elective surgery or procedure.”[20] If a physician was reported for having performed a non-urgent elective surgery or procedure, it could result in a temporary suspension hearing with or without notice depending on the circumstances. Any Board action to restrict or suspend a licensee’s license, even if temporary, would trigger a mandatory report to the NPDB. Therefore, if a physician believed that any of the surgeries or procedures performed by another physician were non-urgent, that physician would be required to immediately report the performing physician. The performing physician could then have to defend the action before the Board at a temporary suspension hearing. As the Board can temporarily suspend a practitioner without notice, the provider may not have an opportunity to defend the procedures until after the suspension has been put in effect. In addition, the suspension would be reported to the NPDB which would then send out a notice to all payors the provider is credentialed with. Therefore, all providers should be aware that the performance of any procedure or surgery at this time comes at a risk and therefore, only truly necessary procedures or surgeries should be completed.

Liles Parker attorneys and staff are closely monitoring HHS, CMS and CDC guidance and will update this article as new information becomes available. Please contact us with questions or for assistance with your response to this unprecedented National Emergency.

Call Meaghan McCormick for help with an 1155 waiver.Meaghan McCormick is an Associate at Liles Parker, Attorneys & Clients at Law.  She has experience representing health care providers and suppliers around the country in connection with a wide range of health law matters.  Questions regarding the impact of recent coronavirus guidance on your organization?  Call Liles Parker, PLLC for a free consultation.  We can be reached at:  1 (800) 465-1906.

[1] Proclamation on Declaring a National Emergency Concerning the Novel Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Outbreak, Issued on March 13, 2020.  A link to the declaration can be found here.

[2] Determination that a Public Health Emergency Exists, issued by Secretary Azar on January 31, 2020.  A link to the determination can be found here.

[3] An article that discusses the updates made by Medicare for telemedicine can be accessed here.

[4] The Board’s press release regarding these changes can be accessed here.

[5] The Board’s responses to the FAQs regarding telemedicine during Texas disaster declaration for COVID-19 pandemic can be accessed here.

[6] 22 TAC § 174.5(e)(2)(A) can be accessed here.

[7] The Board’s Press Release regarding the waiver for chronic pain patients can be accessed here.

[8] The full text of the order can be accessed here.

[9] It should be noted that some providers have filed suit against Texas regarding Attorney General Paxton’s declaration.

[10] Press release from Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton can be accessed here.

[11] CDC guidance for healthcare facilities can be accessed here.

[12] CMS’ guidance and tier list can be accessed here.

[13] The Board’s press release regarding the emergency rules passed to enforce Executive Order GA-09 can be accessed here.

[14] The amended 22 TAC § 187.57(c) can be accessed here.

[15] The amended 22 TAC § 178.4(d) can be accessed here.

[16] The Board’s responses to the FAQs regarding non-urgent, elective surgeries and procedures during Texas disaster declaration for COVID-19 pandemic can be accessed here.

[17]  Id.

[18] Id.

[19] Id.

[20] The amended 22 TAC § 178.4(d) can be accessed here.

Small Business Administration Releases Express Bridge Loan Pilot Program for COVID-19

Express Bridge Loan Pilot Program COVID-19(March 26, 2020): The Small Business Administration (“SBA”) announced an Express Bridge Loan Pilot Program on March 25, 2020.[1]   The Express Bridge Loans are available to businesses, including health care providers, to provide economic relief for businesses impacted by the Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) while they await long-term disaster financing.[2]

 

I.   Background:

The Express Bridge Loan Pilot Program was released by the SBA in October 2017 and was created to supplement the SBA’s ability to grant direct disaster loans.[3]  The program provides “expedited guaranteed bridge loan financing for disaster-related purposes” to any small business that is located in a Presidentially-declared disaster area[4] while the business awaits long-term financing, regardless of whether the long-term financing is sought through the SBA disaster loan program.  The Express Bridge Loan Program includes a “streamlined underwriting process” and is designed to “minimize the burden” of applying for a small business loan.[5]

II.   COVID-19 Expansion of the Express Bridge Loan Program:

The SBA expanded its Express Bridge Loan Program, effective March 25, 2020,[6] to include all small businesses impacted by COVID-19 Emergency Declaration.[7] This proclamation includes all states, U.S. Territories, and the District of Columbia. Express Bridge Loans can be approved for health care providers through March 13, 2021.

Express Bridge Loans may be granted at a maximum amount of $25,000 for a loan term of 7 years.  The maximum allowable interest rate is 6.5% over the Prime rate, regardless of the maturity of the loan.[8] A lender may charge an applicable fee of 2% of the loan amount (or $250), whichever is greater.[9] Lenders are not required to take collateral for Express Bridge Loans. The minimum accepted credit score is a FICO Small Business Scoring Service Score of 130.

a. Who is Eligible for an Express Bridge Loan?

Any small business located in any U.S. state, territory, or the District of Columbia that was operational on March 13, 2020.

b. How Does a Health Care Provider Qualify for an Express Bridge Loan?

A health care provider interested in applying for an Express Bridge Loan must demonstrate that it does not have credit available elsewhere.[10]  This can be achieved by having a lender[11] certify on a Lender’s Application for Loan Guaranty Form (SBA Form 1920) that the provider does not have the ability to obtain some or all of the requested loan amount from a non-Federal source, including from the lender completing the form, without SBA assistance.  The lender must also document that the provider / applicant had an operating business located in a disaster area on March 13, 2020, which was adversely impacted by COVID-19.

The provider / applicant must also complete the SBA 7(a) Borrower Information Form (SBA Form 1919). This form should be submitted to the provider’s lender. The form requires information about each of the applicant’s principals, which includes:

  • Sole proprietors;
  • For a general partnership: all general partners and all limited partners owning 20% or more of the equity of the business; or any partner that is involved in the management of the business;
  • For a corporation: all owners of 20% or more of the corporation, and each officer and director;
  • For limited liability companies: all members owning 20% or more of the company, each officer, director, and managing member;
  • Any person hired by the business to management day-to-day operations (“key employees”); and
  • Any Trustor (if the business is owned by a trust).

A separate SBA Form 1919 should be completed and signed by each of the above principals.[12] Finally, the lender must a signed IRS Form 4506-T to obtain an IRS transcript before it disburses the loan.[13]

C. How Soon Will a Provider Receive an Express Bridge Loan Payment?

The first disbursement of an Express Bridge Loan “should occur” within 45 days of the lender’s receipt of an SBA loan number. Disbursement must occur within 90 days of receipt of an SBA loan number or the loan will be cancelled.[14]  The SBA “endeavors” to provide loan numbers within one business day of receipt of the application (if filed through the SBA’s electronic transmission system, “E-Tran”).

III.   Conclusion:

The Federal Government is working with the SBA to make emergency funds available as quickly as possible to providers affected by COVID-19. Liles Parker attorneys are closely monitoring the available programs and are available to assist health care providers with the loan process and to answer any other concerns in response to this National Emergency.

Ashley Morgan is a Senior Associate at the health law firm, Liles Parker, PLLC.  Ms. Morgan represents health care providers and suppliers around the country in a wide variety of regulatory matters.  These include but are not limited to Medicare revocation, suspension and deactivation actions, prepayment reviews, postpayment claims audits, and State Board licensure matters.  Ms. Morgan is also assisting health care providers and suppliers adversely affected by COVID-19 with the completion and submission of SBA business loans.  For a free consultation regarding your needs, please give Ms. Morgan a call.  She can be reached at (202) 298-8750 or toll-free at 1 (800) 475-1906.

[1] Express Bridge Loan Pilot Program Guide, Small Business Administration, https://www.sba.gov/document/support–express-bridge-loan-pilot-program-guide (last accessed Mar. 26, 2020).

[2] COVID-19 SBA Loan Support May be Available for Qualified Health Care Providers, Liles Parker PLLC (Mar. 25, 2020) https://www.lilesparker.com/2020/03/25/covid-19-sba-loan/ (last accessed Mar. 26, 2020).

[3] 82 Fed. Reg. 47958, Express Bridge Loan Pilot Program; Modification of Lending Criteria (Oct. 16, 2017) (codified at 13 CFR Part 120).

[4] Current Declared Disasters, Small Business Administration, https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela/Declarations (last accessed Mar. 26, 2020).

[5] Express Bridge Loan Pilot Program: Program Guide v.2, Small Business Administration, Mar. 25, 2020, p. 3, available at: https://www.sba.gov/document/support–express-bridge-loan-pilot-program-guide (last accessed Mar. 26, 2020).

[6] According to the SBA the expansion of the Express Bridge Loan Program will be published in the Federal Register. Express Bridge Loan Pilot Program: Program Guide v.2, Small Business Administration, Mar. 25, 2020, p. 3, available at: https://www.sba.gov/document/support–express-bridge-loan-pilot-program-guide (last accessed Mar. 26, 2020).

[7] This Emergency Declaration was issued by President Trump on March 13, 2020. Donald Trump, Proclamation on Declaring a National Emergency Concerning the Novel Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Outbreak, The White House, Mar. 13, 2020, https://www.whitehouse.gov/presidential-actions/proclamation-declaring-national-emergency-concerning-novel-coronavirus-disease-covid-19-outbreak/ (last accessed Mar. 26, 2020).

[8] Express Bridge Loan Pilot Program: Program Guide v.2, Small Business Administration, Mar. 25, 2020, p. 7-8, available at: https://www.sba.gov/document/support–express-bridge-loan-pilot-program-guide (last accessed Mar. 26, 2020).

[9] An SBA Form 159 must be completed and signed by the applicant and lender if the lender charges an application fee. Express Bridge Loan Pilot Program: Program Guide v.2, Small Business Administration, Mar. 25, 2020, p. 11, available at: https://www.sba.gov/document/support–express-bridge-loan-pilot-program-guide (last accessed Mar. 26, 2020).

[10] 42 C.F.R. § 120.101.

[11] The lender must have an existing banking relationship with the provider/applicant as of the date of the applicable disaster. Program Guide v.2, Small Business Administration, Mar. 25, 2020, p. 9, available at: https://www.sba.gov/document/support–express-bridge-loan-pilot-program-guide (last accessed Mar. 26, 2020).

[12] SBA 7(a) Borrower Information Form, Small Business Administration (SBA Form 1919) (OMB Control No. 3245-0348) (Exp. Date July 31, 2020).

[13] Express Bridge Loan Pilot Program: Program Guide v.2, Small Business Administration, Mar. 25, 2020, p. 11-12, available at: https://www.sba.gov/document/support–express-bridge-loan-pilot-program-guide (last accessed Mar. 26, 2020).

[14] Express Bridge Loan Pilot Program: Program Guide v.2, Small Business Administration, Mar. 25, 2020, p. 12, available at: https://www.sba.gov/document/support–express-bridge-loan-pilot-program-guide (last accessed Mar. 26, 2020).

Coronavirus Update – HHS & CMS Guidance, Directives and Waivers with Respect to Telemedicine, Provider Enrollment Regulations, Claim Appeals, the Suspension of Non-Emergency Survey Inspections, Nursing Homes, Home Health Agencies, Dialysis Facilities and DME Suppliers.

UPDATED (March 17, 2020): CMS just announced a waiver of certain telehealth coverage requirements so that Medicare beneficiaries can receive a wider range of services from their doctors without having to travel to a healthcare facility. The article below has been updated to address these key takeaways.

(March 16, 2020): On March 13, 2020, President Trump declared a National Emergency[1] related to the current Coronavirus / COVID-19 outbreak. The declaration gives Secretary Alex Azar of the US Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) the power to waive certain Federal requirements in Medicare, Medicaid and CHIP in order to address the outbreak. The President’s declaration was preceded by Secretary Azar’s determination on January 31, 2020[2] that a public health emergency exists.  Since these pronouncements, Liles Parker attorneys have received numerous calls asking for clarification on these waivers and other guidance from HHS and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).  Our clients have also asked that we provide a listing of useful links and other available resources.

As a result of President Trump’s declaration of a national emergency, HHS now has broad authority to make temporary adjustments including:

  1. Applying flexibilities that are already available under normal business rules;
  2. Waiver or modification of policy or procedural norms by the Administrator of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) under his or her authority; and
  3. Waiver or modification of certain Medicare requirements pursuant to waiver authority under § 1135 of the Social Security Act.

As of March 16, 2020, CMS has issued the following guidance, directives and waivers, specifically with regard to the coronavirus outbreak. We recommend providers carefully review the HHS, CMS and/or CDC guidance specific to each service, discipline or facility type for complete details.

I.   Impact of the Coronavirus on Telehealth / Telemedicine Regulations:

The Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2020[3] signed by President Trump on March 6, 2020 included a specific provision addressing Medicare coverage and telehealth services. HB 6074 grants certain powers to the Secretary of Health and Human Services to waive some of the telehealth coverage requirements under the Medicare program. Unfortunately, the new law requires Secretary Azar to issue a waiver addressing any temporary changes to current Medicare telehealth coverage requirements. As of the publication of this article, a waiver has not been released, although CMS Administrator Seema Verma indicated during her remarks on March 13, 2020,[4] that more information would be forthcoming very soon. H.B. 6074 permits Secretary Azar to relax telehealth coverage requirements for all services CMS has approved to be provided via telemedicine as follows:

  • To relax the originating site requirements to include patient homes;
  • To waive the rural HPSA/non-MSA county geographic location requirement so that patients in any geographic location can receive covered telemedicine services; and,
  • To permit phone only telehealth services so long as the phone used has audio and video capabilities (i.e., most smartphones).

The law imposes certain restrictions, even under a waiver from Secretary Azar. Importantly, the relaxed coverage requirements would only extend to services provided by a physician or practitioner (or another physician or practitioner in that provider’s group practice) to an established patient, meaning an individual the provider has seen during the 3-year period before a telehealth service is furnished. We will update this article when a specific waiver is issued.

UPDATE (3/17/2020): CMS just announced a waiver of certain telehealth coverage requirements so that Medicare beneficiaries can receive a wider range of services from their doctors without having to travel to a healthcare facility. Here are the key takeaways from this important announcement:

  • Effective for services starting March 6, 2020 and for the duration of the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency, Medicare will make payment for Medicare telehealth services furnished to patients in broader circumstances.
  • These visits are considered the same as in-person visits and are paid at the same rate as regular, in-person visits.
  • Starting March 6, 2020 and for the duration of the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency, Medicare will make payment for professional services furnished to beneficiaries in all areas of the country in all settings.
  • While they must generally travel to or be located in certain types of originating sites such as a physician’s office, skilled nursing facility or hospital for the visit, effective for services starting March 6, 2020 and for the duration of the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency, Medicare will make payment for Medicare telehealth services furnished to beneficiaries in any healthcare facility and in their home.
  • The Medicare coinsurance and deductible would generally apply to these services. However, the HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) is providing flexibility for healthcare providers to reduce or waive cost-sharing for telehealth visits paid by federal healthcare programs.
  • To the extent the 1135 waiver requires an established relationship, HHS will not conduct audits to ensure that such a prior relationship existed for claims submitted during this public health emergency.
  • HHS’ Office of Civil Rights will exercise enforcement discretion and waive penalties for HIPAA violations against health care providers that serve patients in good faith through everyday communications technologies, such as FaceTime or Skype, during the COVID-19 nationwide public health emergency.[18]

Note that the waiver does not restrict coverage to patients with coronavirus or symptoms of coronavirus. Any service that a provider can safely deliver via telemedicine and is on CMS’ list of approved telemedicine services[19] will be permitted under the new waiver. This waiver of Medicare program and HIPAA requirements will last for the duration of the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency. We do recommend that you check with your State licensing board to verify state requirements for telemedicine if you are unfamiliar with what is permitted in your state. Liles Parker has advised numerous clients with regard to telemedicine services.

In the meantime, CMS has reminded providers of the following options to provide covered non-face to face services to Medicare patients:

  • Medicare pays for “virtual check-ins” for patients to connect with their doctors without going to the doctor’s office. These brief, virtual check-in services are for patients with an established relationship with a physician or certain practitioners where the communication is not related to a medical visit within the previous 7 days and does not lead to a medical visit within the next 24 hours (or soonest appointment available). The patient must verbally consent to using virtual check-ins and the consent must be documented in the medical record prior to the patient using the service. The Medicare coinsurance and deductible would apply to these services. Doctors and certain practitioners may bill for these virtual check-in services furnished through several communication technology modalities, such as telephone (HCPCS code G2012) or captured video or image (HCPCS code G2010).
  • Medicare also pays for patients to communicate with their doctors without going to the doctor’s office using online patient portals. The individual communications, like the virtual check ins, must be initiated by the patient; however, practitioners may educate beneficiaries on the availability of this kind of service prior to patient initiation. The communications can occur over a 7-day period. The services may be billed using CPT codes 99421-99423 and HCPCS codes G2061-G206, as applicable. The Medicare coinsurance and deductible would apply to these services.
  • In addition, Medicare beneficiaries living in rural areas may use telehealth technology to have full visits with their physicians. The patient must be present at an approved telehealth originating site and must receive services using a real-time audio and video communication system at the site to communicate with a remotely located doctor or certain other types of practitioners. Medicare pays for many medical visits through this telehealth benefit. The Medicare coinsurance and deductible would apply to these services. For additional information on this benefit, please see CMS’s Telehealth resource page [5] for additional details and requirements.
  • Medicare Advantage Plans were given the authority to expand their telehealth coverage through enhanced benefit packages last year, but coverage still varies from plan to plan. CMS also issued a waiver on March 10, 2020 permitting (but not requiring) Medicare Advantage Plans to expand access to certain telehealth services. We recommend checking with the plans with which you contract for specific details or contact Liles Parker for assistance.
  • Many State Medicaid programs already cover telehealth/telemedicine services provided to patients in their homes. Liles Parker can assist in determining what your State Medicaid program covers.

II.   Impact of the Coronavirus on Medicare Provider Enrollment Regulations:

CMS has issued a blanket waiver related to provider enrollment requirements[6] to do the following:

  • Establish a toll-free hotline for non-certified Part B suppliers, physicians and nonphysician; practitioners to enroll and receive temporary Medicare billing privileges;
  • Waive the following screening requirements:
    • Application Fee – 42 C.F.R § 424.514
    • Criminal background checks associated with FCBC – 42 C.F.R § 424.518
    • Site visits – 42 C.F.R § 424.517
  • Postpone all revalidation actions;
  • Allow licensed providers to render services outside of their state of enrollment; and,
  • Expedite any pending or new applications from providers.

Liles Parker provides assistance to all types of providers seeking to enroll in the Medicare program.

III.   Impact of the Coronavirus on Medicare Claim Appeals:

CMS has issued a blanket waiver applicable to fee-for-service Medicare, Medicare Advantage and Medicare Part D claim appeals.[7]  The blanket waiver provides for the following relief:

  • Extensions to file an appeal
  • Waiving timeliness for requests for additional information to adjudicate the appeal;
  • Processing the appeal even with incomplete Appointment of Representation forms but communicating only to the beneficiary;
  • Processing requests for appeal that don’t meet the required elements using information that is available.
  • Utilizing all flexibilities available in the appeal process as if good cause requirements are satisfied.

IV.   Suspension of Non-Emergency Survey Inspections Due to Coronavirus:

On March 4, 2020, CMS issued a Memorandum[8] advising that it is temporarily suspending non-emergency survey inspections, allowing providers to focus on the most current serious health and safety threats, like infectious diseases and abuse. Specifically, survey activity is limited to the following (in Priority Order):

  • All immediate jeopardy complaints (cases that represents a situation in which entity noncompliance has placed the health and safety of recipients in its care at risk for serious injury, serious harm, serious impairment or death or harm) and allegations of abuse and neglect;
  • Complaints alleging infection control concerns, including facilities with potential COVID-19 or other respiratory illnesses;
  • Statutorily required recertification surveys (Nursing Home, Home Health, Hospice, and ICF/IID facilities);
  • Any re-visits necessary to resolve current enforcement actions;
  • Initial certifications;
  • Surveys of facilities/hospitals that have a history of infection control deficiencies at the immediate jeopardy level in the last three years;
  • Surveys of facilities/hospitals/dialysis centers that have a history of infection control deficiencies at lower levels than immediate jeopardy.

CMS is maintaining a website[9] with consolidated guidance to surveyors related to coronavirus and infection control in hospitals, nursing homes, hospices, home health, and dialysis facilities.

V.   Nursing Homes:

CMS issued a revised Memorandum[10] on March 13, 2020 with specific guidance to nursing homes, including:

  • Directing nursing homes to temporarily restrict all visitors and nonessential personnel with a few exceptions such as end-of-life situations, and to cancel all communal dining and group activities.
  • Screening their staff and outside healthcare providers using CDC guidelines for restricting access to health care workers.
  • Notifying their local health department if a resident is suspected of having COVID-19. Facilities that can follow the infection prevention and control practices recommended by CDC may or may not need to transfer the patient, depending on the severity of the patient’s symptoms. If a resident must be transferred to a hospital, careful coordination with EMS and the receiving facility must be performed, including placing a facemask on the patient during transfer.
  • Accepting patients diagnosed with COVID-19 and still under Transmission-Based Precautions for COVID-19 as long as the facility can follow CDC guidance;
  • Accepting patients who are not diagnosed with COVID-19 from hospitals or other locations where a case of COVID-19 was/is present; and,
  • Obligations to maintain appropriate PPE and alcohol-based hand rub supply levels, while assuring facilities they will not be cited by surveyors so long as they can demonstrate they are having difficulty obtaining the supplies for reasons outside their control. Nursing homes are advised to contact with their local and state public health agency to notify them of any shortage, follow national guidelines for optimizing their current supply, and identify the next best option to care for their residents.

CMS also exercised its authority to waive certain coverage requirements for skilled nursing services on March 13, 2020, including the following:

  • CMS is waiving the 3-day prior hospitalization for coverage of a skilled nursing facility (SNF) stay for those people who need to be transferred as a result of the coronavirus emergency. In addition, for certain beneficiaries who recently exhausted their SNF benefits, it authorizes renewed SNF coverage without first having to start a new benefit period.
  • Second, CMS is waiving 42 CFR 483.20 to provide relief to SNFs on the timeframe requirements for Minimum Data Set assessments and transmission.

VI.   Home Health Agencies:

CMS has issued a blanket waiver[11] to provide relief to home health agencies (HHAs) on the timeframes related to OASIS Transmission. The waiver also allows Medicare Administrative Contractors to extend the auto-cancellation date of Requests for Anticipated Payment (RAPs) during emergencies. Please consult with your home health MAC for specific guidance.

Additionally, on March 10, 2020, CMS issued guidance [12] on addressing potential and confirmed COVID-19 cases and mitigating transmission including screening, treatment, and transfer to higher level care (when appropriate).

VII.   Hospitals:

On March 4, 2020, CMS issued guidance[13] regarding infection control and prevention related to COVID-19 cases.  In addition, CMS has issued blanket waivers applicable to hospitals[14] addressing a number of issues.[17] Some of the most significant include:

  • CMS is waiving the requirements that Critical Access Hospitals limit the number of beds to 25, and that the length of stay be limited to 96 hours.
  • CMS is waiving requirements to allow acute care hospitals to house acute care inpatients in excluded distinct part units, where the distinct part unit’s beds are appropriate for acute care inpatient.
  • CMS is waiving to allow acute care hospitals with excluded distinct part inpatient psychiatric units that, as a result of a disaster or emergency, need to relocate inpatients from the excluded distinct part psychiatric unit to an acute care bed and unit.
  • CMS is waiving requirements to allow acute care hospitals with excluded distinct part inpatient Rehabilitation units that, as a result of a disaster or emergency, need to relocate inpatients from the excluded distinct part rehabilitation unit to an acute care bed and unit.

VIII.   Coronavirus Related Waivers Issued by CMS to DME Suppliers:

A blanket waiver[15] has been issued by CMS as of March 13, 2020 to address lost, destroyed, irreparably damaged or otherwise unusable Durable Medical Equipment (DME).  DME Medicare Administrative Contractors (MACs) will have the flexibility to waive replacement requirements such that the face-to-face requirement, a new physician’s order, and new medical necessity documentation are not required. Suppliers must still include a narrative description on the claim explaining the reason why the equipment must be replaced and are reminded to maintain documentation indicating that the DMEPOS was lost, destroyed, irreparably damaged or otherwise rendered unusable or unavailable as a result of the emergency. Please check your DME MAC website for more information or contact Liles Parker for assistance.

IX.   Dialysis Facilities:

On March 10, 2020, CMS issued guidance[16] addressing potential and confirmed COVID-19 cases and mitigating transmission including screening, treatment, and transfer to higher level care (when appropriate).

X.   Conclusion:

Liles Parker attorneys and staff are closely monitoring HHS, CMS and CDC guidance and will update this article as new information becomes available. Please contact us with questions or for assistance with your response to this unprecedented National Emergency.

Jennifer Papapanagiotou is a Partner at Liles Parker, Attorneys & Clients at Law.  She has decades of experience representing health care providers and suppliers around the country in connection with a wide range of regulatory actions.  Questions regarding the impact of recent coronavirus guidance on your organization?  Call Jennifer for a free consultation.  She can be reached at:  1 (800) 465-1906.

[1] Proclamation on Declaring a National Emergency Concerning the Novel Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Outbreak, Issued on March 13, 2020.  A link to the declaration can be found here.

[2] Determination that a Public Health Emergency Exists, issued by Secretary Azar on January 31, 2020.  A link to the determination can be found here.

[3] ‘‘Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2020.”  H.B. 6074

[4] Emergency Declaration Press Call Remarks by CMS Administrator Seema Verma, delivered March 13, 2020.  A link to the remarks can be found here.

[1] Medicare Telemedicine Health Care Provider Fact Sheet, dated March 17, 2020, can be found here. Frequently Asked Questions expanding on the fact sheet and giving more details on implementation can be found here.

[2] HHS’s Office of Civil Rights is maintaining a website with more information on this topic here.

[3] You can find CMS’ list of approved telemedicine services here.

[5] CMS’s telehealth resource page can be found here.  

[6] COVID-19 Emergency Declaration Health Care Providers Fact Sheet, dated March 13, 2020, can be found here. Provider enrollment waivers of certain requirements are outlined in the guidance.

[7] Ibid. Waivers to the administrative claims appeals process are outlined on page 3 of the document.

[8] Memorandum titled “Suspension of Survet Activities,” dated March 4, 2020.  A copy of the Memorandum can be found here.

[9] CMS guidance titled “Updates for State Surveyors and Accrediting Organizations” can be found here.  

[10]CMS Memorandum titled Guidance for Infection Control and Prevention of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Nursing Homes (REVISED),” can be found here.

[11] COVID-19 Emergency Declaration Health Care Providers Fact Sheet, dated March 13, 2020, can be found here.   Home health agency guidance is on page 3 of the Fact Sheet.

[12] CMS Memorandum titled Guidance for Infection Control and Prevention Concerning Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Home Health Agencies (HHAs), was issued on March 10, 2020, and can be found here.

[13] CMS Memorandum titled Guidance for Infection Control and Prevention Concerning Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19): FAQs and Considerations for Patient Triage, Placement and Hospital Discharge,” dated March 4, 2020, can be found here.  

[14] COVID-19 Emergency Declaration Health Care Providers Fact Sheet, dated March 13, 2020, can be found here.   Hospital guidance is on pages 1-3 of the Fact Sheet.

[15]COVID-19 Emergency Declaration Health Care Providers Fact Sheet, dated March 13, 2020, can be found here.   DME related guidance is on page 1 of the Fact Sheet.

[16] CMS issued guidance on March 10, 2020

[17]  Medicare Telemedicine Health Care Provider Fact Sheet, dated March 17, 2020, can be found here. Frequently Asked Questions expanding on the fact sheet and giving more details on implementation can be found here. 

[18] HHS’s Office of Civil Rights is maintaining a website with more information on this topic here.

[19] You can find CMS’ list of approved telemedicine services here.

[20]